Dear Diary: You Write Like You Speak

Someone told me, a while ago, “you write like you speak”. I don’t believe this was meant to be a compliment nor was it meant to be a criticism.  Merely an observation? A tiny soundbite to make me think?

This comment popped into my thoughts after I had finished rambling on, in my mind, an observation of my own.

I had been on my back porch enjoying my morning coffee and examining the word love and how it has been used or not used throughout my 34 years of existence.

I attempted to recall my older sisters’ usage of the word and noted my younger brothers frequent conversational ending; “I Love you”. I accepted my own use of the word; multiple times throughout the day with my children and mostly in response to those residing outside my domain.

As I try to scrutinize how three people, who grew up in the same home, with the same parental figures, could have greatly varying practices of uttering this word, there it was… “You write like you speak”.

But why? How did that remark fit into this mental dialog? The fact that this comment lingers in my cranial filing system and has the wherewithal to spring forward, without being summoned, deserves some exploring.

Through all this black and white chatter, strangely, I am left with this thought; be mindful when speaking because words have sticking power.

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Old’skool Traditions

I’ve never really dug into the significance of “jumping the broom” but, I have also seen it as a tradition that my family practices. I never really asked the question ‘why?’ to get an answer. I just expected that every familial wedding that I attended would end with the couple “jumping the broom”.

I searched around the internet to find out what this really does symbolize, and this is what I found.

The broom has both symbolic and spiritual importance in the African culture. The ritual itself was created by our ancestors during slavery. Because slaves could not legally marry, they created their own rituals to honor their unions. Some say broom jumping comes from an African tribal marriage ritual of placing sticks on the ground representing the couple’s new home.

I found this very interesting because I was looking through some old 1434144272352pictures and found this:

We were never ‘legally able to marry, so does this photo mean that I am married?

I don’t know why I would even think of this… Welcome to my mind where everything is analysed and scrutinized.

One last random musing: skinny jeans?